Meriden Estate Planning

Find the right Wills & Trusts attorney in Meriden, CT

In Meriden, estate planning refers to the procedure of deciding what should be done with one's assets after their death.

Estate planning frequently requires the advice of a legal and/or financial expert, because the issues involved can be perplexing, and are regarded by most to be extremely important. A flawed estate plan might create conflict between your survivors, resulting in your intentions not being given effect.

Estate planning can have numerous positive effects on the planner during life, as well. These benefits are normally somewhat intangible, revolving around the peace of mind that comes with knowing that, after your death, you family will be taken care of and that they'll know what your last wishes are. Nonetheless, most people find this very valuable. To that end, you should come up with a power-of-attorney agreement. When you grant someone power of attorney, you have given them the power to make particular decisions on your behalf. You can grant them as much or as little authority as you want. Most individuals, however, give family members or life partners power of attorney with respect to medical care, so if they become incapacitated, their wishes will still be carried out.

The last thing a person wants to think about is the possibility that, after their death, their survivors are fighting over some part of their estate plan that's ambiguous or otherwise contentious. If you want to keep this, or at least make it far less possible, you should have the help of a Meriden attorney every step of the way.

Common Features of Meriden Estates

Will: Wills are a very important part of almost all estate plans. In simplest terms, it answers the question "who gets what after I die?" Typically, you can leave your property to anyone you wish. If you die without a will, your property will usually be given to your closest living relative (usually a spouse or child).

Living Will: Unlike ordinary wills, a living will contains instructions regarding a person's medical care. Some recent high-profile controversies have illustrated the importance of making a living will, even for younger individuals. In a living will, you can give your family members and doctors instructions about your desired medical care, in case you become incapacitated (comatose or brain-dead, for example) and can't tell them yourself. Some people say that they would not want to be kept alive by artificial means if they are in a vegetative state, and there's no chance of recovery. If this is you, that's definitely something to include in a living will. Of course, if you would prefer the opposite, being kept alive as long as is medically feasible, you can put that in your living will, as well.

Power of Attorney: Power of attorney allows you to grant someone else (normally a trusted family member or friend) the power to make certain decisions in your place, with the same legal effect as if you had made them yourself, in the event that you become unable to do so (normally due to mental or physical incapacity). If you decide to give someone power of attorney, you should make your wishes known to them in advance, so they are more likely to make the same decisions that you would make, if you were able to. And, of course, you should exclusively give this authority to someone with whom you would trust your life because that is, in some cases, just what you're doing.

Funeral Arrangements: Whatever your preference on this matter (if you have a preference) you should make it known to your family both verbally and in writing. If you have very particular wishes regarding the final disposition of your mortal remains, you should not put those instructions in your will. Or, if you do, you should also put them somewhere else. Wills are usually not read for quite some time after a person dies, and the funeral is normally long over by then, so it will be too late to follow your instructions.

Do I Need a Meriden Estates Lawyer?

A flawed estate plan in Meriden can result in those affected by it being confused as to your intent, which can then lead to disputes between them. A seasoned attorney can commonly avoid this confusion by ensuring that there is as little ambiguity as possible in your will and other related documents.

Talk to a Wills, Trusts and Estates Law Attorney now!

Life in Meriden

Meriden, Connecticut is a city in New Haven County. It currently has a population of about 60,000 people.

Meriden, which was originally part of Wallingford, became a separate city in 1727, and was incorporated in 1867. During the Industrial Revolution, Meriden earned the nickname "The Silver City," because it was a major center for the manufacture of silver products. The Parker Brothers gun company was founded in Meriden, and the manufacture of firearms during the Civil War and Spanish-American war was a major source of factory jobs in the area. The gun companywas not affiliated with the toy and game company of the same name.

Like many cities whose economies were based on manufacturing, Meriden has fallen on hard economic times in recent decades, with the closing of many of the factories that drove its economy. However, as with most of these cities, Meriden's economy is gradually recovering and diversifying.

Meriden, Connecticut lawyers are ready to handle virtually any case that a resident of the area is likely to face. If you have any legal issue, you shouldn't hesitate to call a Meriden, Connecticut lawyer.

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