Power of Attorney in Gainesville, Florida

Find the right Power of Attorney attorney in Gainesville, FL

In Gainesville, Florida, power of attorney is an arrangement in which one person (the principal) gives another (the attorney-in-fact) the capacity to act on the principal's behalf in particular situations, and under particular conditions. Power of attorney might be authorized for any number of reasons, but it is most commonly set up to allow the attorney-in-fact to make financial and medical decisions on the principal's behalf in the event that the principal becomes incapacitated.

Any power-of-attorney arrangement creates the possibility that the attorney-in-fact will abuse the power he or she has been authorized, and it's simply not feasible to totally eliminate this possibility. It can be minimized, however, by giving the attorney the bare minimum amount of power needed to carry out your wishes, and making your wishes known in writing (with copies held by at least one other person) well in advance. When authorizing power of attorney, you can typically grant as much authority as you want, so you need to be very careful, and only give this legal authority to somebody you know and trust. Also, you should consider your circumstances and objectives when determining what type of power to grant.

For example, some people have particular wishes, whether based on religion or personal preference, about how they should be cared for at the end of their life. Oftentimes, people who are at the end of their lives become unable to express their wishes. Thus, it becomes necessary to have somebody else who knows what they would want, and has the legal authority to give effect to those wishes.

In Gainesville, Florida, you can find pre-printed power-of-attorney forms in many office supply stores. If the agreement you want to create isn't very complex, these could be a viable and very affordable option. Of course, it never hurts to have a lawyer help.

Types of Power of Attorney Arrangements in Gainesville, Florida

In Gainesville, Florida, there are 3 types of power of attorney. They are:

1. Limited power of attorney - this authorizes the attorney-in-fact to act on your behalf on a single subject, in one instance. This is a good option if you are involved in a business transaction happening in another state or country. Suppose you want to buy a house on the other side of the country, and just need to sign a few papers to finish the deal. Rather than incurring the expense of traveling there, you could give limited power of attorney to a third party who lives in that state, and they can sign the paperwork for you, finishing the deal. The power you've granted them would expire automatically once the deal is done.

2. Durable power of attorney - this gives the attorney in fact the power to make decisions on a general area of the principal's affairs (for instance, the authority to access the principal's assets to pay the principal's debts, or the power to make healthcare decisions on behalf of the principal). Unlike limited power of attorney, durable power of attorney does not expire unless the principal revokes it. This is useful, because it authorizes the attorney-in-fact to make important decisions for the principal if the principal becomes incapacitated.

3. Springing power of attorney - this is a lot like durable power of attorney, but it does not normally take effect immediately. Instead, the power vests on the occurrence of particular condition(s) laid out by the principal. The principal could make the condition anything he or she wants, permitting power of attorney to vest only if, say, a person flies to Saturn. Of course, these arrangements are normally not so outlandish. Normally the event that must take place is the principal becoming incapacitated. This permits the principal to make his or her own decisions while they're able, but also ensures that someone they trust will be able to carry out their wishes in the event that they become too sick or weak to express them.

Can a Gainesville, Florida Lawyer Help?

Because setting up a power of attorney agreement is not always simple in Gainesville, Florida, it's never imprudent to at least talk with a lawyer beforehand. As with any legal agreement, there are things that can go wrong, which laypersons may not foresee.

Talk to a Wills, Trusts and Estates Law Attorney now!

Life in Gainesville

Gainesville, Florida is the largest city in, and the county seat of, Alachua County, Florida. Its population is approximately 125,000 people.

Human habitation of the area that now includes Gainesville, Florida dates back at least 12,000 years. One of the ancient structures left behind by these people is colloquially known as the "Law School Mound." It is a burial mound that sits on the University of Florida Law School's campus, and it is estimated to be over 1,000 years old.

Many Gainesville, Florida attorneys studied law at this university. These lawyers are drawn to Gainesville because of its low cost of living, and business-friendly culture. Gainesville is also known for its promotion of solar energy, which allows private property owners with solar panels on their land to supply excess electricity back into the local power grid, helping people recoup the cost of investing in solar panels, making this environmentally-friendly practice more attractive.

If you live in Gainesville, Florida and are in need of legal advice, chances are good that a local Gainesville, Florida attorney can help.

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