Power of Attorney in Springfield, Illinois

Find the right Power of Attorney attorney in Springfield, IL

Power of attorney in Springfield, Illinois allows one person to make certain decisions for another, under certain conditions. There are various reasons why one might grant power of attorney. However, most of them revolve around the possible incapacitation of the person granting the power - so that their wishes can be carried out even if they become unable to express them.

The principal is able to dictate the exact scope of the attorney-in-fact's authority. If you are giving someone power of attorney, you're probably planning on giving it to a close friend, family member, or life partner. The exact scope of the power is up to you, and will depend on what your goals are.

One very common reason for granting power of attorney is that the grantor believes that they might become incapacitated, due to age or illness, in the relatively near future, and they want to make sure that their preferences relating to care at the end of their life are followed. Of course, if nobody knows what that person's preferences are, and the patient is unable to express them, family members and doctors will simply have to guess. Obviously, there's a good chance that they could get it wrong. Therefore, you should make your desires well-known to those who will be in a position to implement it, and grant, in writing, a person you trust (such as a spouse, life partner, sibling, or adult child) the power to carry out your wishes, if necessary.

In Springfield, Illinois, you can probably find pre-printed forms at office supply stores available for purchase. They already have the basic terms of a power-of-attorney agreement written, and just require the parties to fill in the blanks with names, dates, and a few other details.

Types of Power of Attorney Arrangements in Springfield, Illinois

In Springfield, Illinois, there are 3 forms of power of attorney. They are:

1. Limited power of attorney - this lets the attorney-in-fact exercise limited authority in a single transaction. It is useful, for example, if someone is buying property in another state, and the deal is nearly complete, but a few documents need to be signed. The buyer could give a resident of that state power of attorney, allowing him or her to complete the transaction on the buyer's behalf. Conveniently, the power automatically terminates when the transaction is complete.

2. Durable power of attorney - this gives the attorney-in-fact much more power than limited power of attorney. It can, in theory, give them unlimited power in a specific area of the principal's affairs. The document should lay out exactly what power the attorney-in-fact will wield. This arrangement, when used carefully, can be very useful, allowing the attorney-in-fact to make important decisions for the principal as long as is necessary, because it does not automatically disappear after a single transaction. Also, the principal can revoke the power of attorney at any time.

3. Springing power of attorney - under this arrangement, the attorney-in-fact does not get power of attorney until the happening of some specified event. The specified event is usually the incapacity or disability of the principal, though it can be virtually any event you wish. You should be aware, however, that it is not always clear when the principal has become sufficiently "disabled" for the power of attorney to take effect. This question sometimes has to be determined by a court, which can be costly and time-consuming.

Can a Springfield, Illinois Lawyer Help?

Because setting up a power of attorney agreement is not always easy in Springfield, Illinois, it's never imprudent to at least consult with a lawyer beforehand. As with any legal agreement, there are things that can go wrong, which laypersons may not foresee.

Talk to a Wills, Trusts and Estates Law Attorney now!

Life in Springfield

Springfield, Illinois is the capital of the state of Illinois. It is also the county seat of Sangamon County. Its current population is approximately 116,000 people.

Springfield, Illinois is best known for being the longtime residence of President Abraham Lincoln, who worked as a lawyer in Springfield, Illinois before being elected president and moving to Washington, D.C.

Because it is the capital of a large state, but relatively small in population, the biggest employer in Springfield, Illinois is the state government. The state of Illinois employs a large number of Springfield, Illinois lawyers. They serve as public defenders, prosecuting attorneys, and attorneys that represent the state in civil matters.

On top of that, there are many Springfield, Illinois attorneys in private practice. So, if you need legal advice, or some other legal service, you should start by contacting a qualified Springfield, Illinois attorney.

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