Power of Attorney in Boston, Massachusetts

Find the right Power of Attorney attorney in Boston, MA

Power of attorney in Boston, Massachusetts allows one person to make certain decisions for another, under certain conditions. There are numerous reasons why one might grant power of attorney. However, most of them revolve around the possible incapacitation of the person authorizing the power - so that their wishes can be carried out even if they become unable to express them.

Any power-of-attorney arrangement creates the possibility that the attorney-in-fact will abuse the power he or she has been authorized, and it's simply not feasible to totally eliminate this possibility. It can be minimized, however, by giving the attorney the bare minimum amount of power needed to carry out your wishes, and making your wishes known in writing (with copies held by at least one other person) well in advance. When authorizing power of attorney, you can generally grant as much authority as you want, so you need to be very careful, and only give this legal authority to somebody you know and trust. Also, you should consider your circumstances and objectives when determining what type of power to grant.

For instance, if you have very particular wishes concerning end-of-life care, you should, of course, make them clear to the person who will be acting on your behalf, and make sure they are ready to carry them out. You should then grant them power of attorney, with the scope limited to certain healthcare and financial decisions. That way, if you become incapacitated, your loved one will be able to carry out your wishes, even if you are unable to express them.

In Boston, Massachusetts, you can likely find pre-printed forms at office supply stores available for purchase. They already have the basic terms of a power-of-attorney agreement written, and just need the parties to fill in the blanks with names, dates, and a few other details.

Types of Power of Attorney Arrangements in Boston, Massachusetts

In Boston, Massachusetts, there are 3 types of power of attorney. They are:

1. Limited power of attorney - this lets the attorney-in-fact exercise limited authority in a single transaction. It is useful, for instance, if someone is buying property in another state, and the deal is nearly complete, but a few documents need to be signed. The buyer could give a resident of that state power of attorney, allowing him or her to complete the transaction on the buyer's behalf. Conveniently, the power automatically terminates when the transaction is complete.

2. Durable power of attorney - unlike limited power of attorney, discussed above, this does not automatically expire, though the principal can dissolve it at any time. It is usually not limited to a single transaction, either. Rather, it covers a broader subject matter, though it still has limits. For instance, you could give someone durable power of attorney to make medical decisions for you, but they would only be allowed to act in that context.

3. Springing power of attorney - this is a lot like durable power of attorney, but it does not usually take effect immediately. Rather, the power vests on the occurrence of certain condition(s) laid out by the principal. The principal could make the condition anything he or she wants, allowing power of attorney to vest only if, say, a person flies to Saturn. Of course, these arrangements are usually not so outlandish. Usually the event that must take place is the principal becoming incapacitated. This allows the principal to make his or her own decisions while they're able, but also ensures that someone they trust will be able to carry out their wishes in the event that they become too sick or weak to express them.

Can a Boston, Massachusetts Lawyer Help?

While setting up power of attorney in Boston, Massachusetts can be simple, there are some situations in which it will inevitably be convoluted. In such cases, the process will be much easier if you have a reputable attorney to help you along the way.

Talk to a Wills, Trusts and Estates Law Attorney now!

Life in Boston

Boston, Massachusetts is known as the "Capital of New England" because it acts as the center of business, art, food, and culture. Bostonians comprise the 10th largest metropolitan area in the United States. Boston is home to a number of historical attractions like the Boston Tea Party, the Boston Massacre, and the American Revolution museums that offer about billion in revenue for the city.

Furthermore, tourists flock to visit Boston and its colleges: Harvard University, Boston College, Boston University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tufts University, UMass Boston, and many other business, music, and pharmaceutical institutions of higher learning. Students offer roughly .8 billion to the economy. With so many students, Boston naturally is home to some of the top firms in technology and biotechnology. The city boasts the highest amount of annual funding from the National Institutes of Health.

Boston is home to some outstanding New England based lawyers and law firms. Bostonians are subject to the area's high cost of living making the legal problems of the community somewhat unique. Violent crime has been on the decline since the Boston Police Department and United States Attorney and District Attorney started a crime and gang prevention campaign. Most Boston residents use the Suffolk County courts.

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