Power of Attorney in Fayetteville, North Carolina

Find the right Power of Attorney attorney in Fayetteville, NC

In Fayetteville, North Carolina, "power of attorney" refers to a number of different legal arrangements. However, the different systems which fall under the umbrella of that term have one thing in common: if somebody grants power of attorney to somebody else, the person with power of attorney is authorized to make certain decisions on behalf of the person who granted it. There are many reasons why a person might want to grant this power to another, but it frequently granted in contemplation of the possibility that the grantor might become unable to express his or her wishes due to some form of incapacity.

The principal is able to dictate the precise scope of the attorney-in-fact's authority. If you are giving someone power of attorney, you're probably planning on giving it to a close friend, family member, or life partner. The exact scope of the power is up to you, and will depend on what your goals are.

If you have a strong preference with respect to end-of-life care, but worry that you might be unable to express your wishes when the time comes, you may want to give a family member the legal authority to make such decisions for you, if necessary. Of course, the power you grant them should be precisely limited to medical decisions, if that's all you want them to be able to decide. It should also clearly state that this power will not actually vest until and unless you actually become incapacitated. For reasons that should be obvious, you should only give this power to a person you trust.

In Fayetteville, North Carolina, you can sometimes find pre-printed forms that let you easily draft a power-of-attorney agreement. However, if your situation is particularly complex, you should probably have a lawyer draft it for you, to ensure that the agreement is enforceable, or that there are no surprises.

Types of Power of Attorney Arrangements in Fayetteville, North Carolina

In Fayetteville, North Carolina, there are 3 types of power of attorney. They are:

1. Limited power of attorney - this allows the attorney-in-fact to act on your behalf on a single subject, in one instance. This is a good option if you are involved in a business transaction happening in another state or country. Suppose you want to buy a house on the other side of the country, and just need to sign a few papers to finalize the deal. Rather than incurring the expense of traveling there, you could give limited power of attorney to a third party who lives in that state, and they can sign the paperwork for you, completing the deal. The power you've granted them would expire automatically once the deal is done.

2. Durable power of attorney - this gives the attorney-in-fact much more power than limited power of attorney. It can, in theory, give them unlimited power in a specific area of the principal's affairs. The document should lay out exactly what power the attorney-in-fact will wield. This agreement, when used carefully, can be very useful, allowing the attorney-in-fact to make important decisions for the principal as long as is necessary, because it does not automatically disappear after a single transaction. Also, the principal can revoke the power of attorney at any time.

3. Springing power of attorney - under this arrangement, the attorney-in-fact does not get power of attorney until the happening of some specified event. The specified event is usually the incapacity or disability of the principal, though it can be virtually any event you wish. You should be aware, however, that it is not always clear when the principal has become sufficiently "disabled" for the power of attorney to take effect. This question sometimes has to be decided by a court, which can be costly and time-consuming.

Can a Fayetteville, North Carolina Lawyer Help?

Setting up a power of attorney arrangement in Fayetteville, North Carolina can be easy, but it can also be very perplexing. It just varies on what you're trying to do. However, if you are at all unsure about how to proceed, it would probably be a good idea to have an attorney draft the agreement for you.

Talk to a Wills, Trusts and Estates Law Attorney now!

Life in Fayetteville

Fayetteville, North Carolina is a relatively large city with a population of over 200,000 residents. It serves as the county seat for Cumberland County, and is located in an area known as "the Sandhills". Fayetteville was named "one of the best places to retire" by Where to Retire magazine. The city is rich in early American history, as the U.S. Constitution was ratified in Fayetteville in 1789.

Military culture plays a large role in Fayetteville. The city is best known for its close proximity to Fort Bragg, a major U.S. Army outpost. In 2008, Fayetteville, North Carolina was officially named "The World's First Sanctuary for Military Families". Citizens and businesses of the city often demonstrate their support for the military through participation in volunteer groups.

Fayetteville also maintains several festive events every year. In particular, the Dogwood Festival in the spring and Christmas in the Park attract a large number of participants. These local gatherings showcase art displays, theater performances, and food vendors. Overall, Fayetteville is an ideal location for business, recreation, and residence.

Fayetteville, North Carolina lawyers are available to assist residents in a variety of legal matters. Fayetteville lawyers often represent their clients in the Superior Court of Cumberland County, which is located in the city.

Clients Rate LegalMatch Attorneys
(click to read reviews)

Regel B.
Regel B.

Wills, Trusts and Estates

Caldwell, LA

Brad M.
Brad M.

Wills, Trusts and Estates

Sussex, NJ

David L.
David L.

Wills, Trusts and Estates

Ashland, OH

Gotham Light