Power of Attorney in Wilmington, North Carolina

Find the right Power of Attorney attorney in Wilmington, NC

In Wilmington, North Carolina, "power of attorney" refers to a number of different legal arrangements. However, the numerous systems which fall under the umbrella of that term have one thing in common: if somebody grants power of attorney to somebody else, the person with power of attorney is authorized to make given decisions on behalf of the person who granted it. There are many reasons why a person might want to grant this power to another, but it usually granted in contemplation of the possibility that the grantor might become unable to express his or her wishes due to some form of incapacity.

The principal in a power-of-attorney arrangement is the one who decides the scope of the power that the attorney will be able to wield, and the circumstances under which they can wield it. Generally, you can grant the attorney-in-fact as much or as little decision-making power as you'd like. In every case, however, you should only enter a power-of-attorney arrangement with somebody you trust. The nature of the power you should grant depends heavily on the context, and what your wishes are.

For instance, if you have very particular wishes concerning end-of-life care, you should, of course, make them clear to the person who will be operating on your behalf, and make sure they are ready to carry them out. You should then grant them power of attorney, with the scope limited to specific healthcare and financial decisions. That way, if you become incapacitated, your loved one will be able to carry out your wishes, even if you are unable to express them.

In Wilmington, North Carolina, you can find pre-printed power-of-attorney forms in many office supply stores. If the agreement you want to create isn't very complex, these could be a viable and very affordable option. Of course, it never hurts to have a lawyer help.

Types of Power of Attorney Arrangements in Wilmington, North Carolina

In Wilmington, North Carolina, power of attorney can take three general forms. They are as follows:

1. Limited power of attorney - limited power of attorney gives the attorney-in-fact the power to act on your behalf on a single issue, in a single transaction. For instance, if you are purchasing a house in another state, you may wish to grant limited power of attorney to a friend or relative who lives in that state, so they can sign all of the proper documents on your behalf, so you don't have to incur travel expenses. For obvious reasons, you should only grant this authority to someone you trust. Once the transaction is complete, the power of attorney automatically disappears.

2. Durable power of attorney - unlike limited power of attorney, discussed above, this does not automatically expire, though the principal can dissolve it at any time. It is typically not limited to a single transaction, either. Rather, it covers a broader subject matter, though it still has limits. For instance, you could give someone durable power of attorney to make medical decisions for you, but they would only be permitted to act in that context.

3. Springing power of attorney - this is close to durable power of attorney, but the power is conditional. That is, it does not take effect unless some particular event takes place. This event can be anything. Most frequently, however, the agreement permits the attorney-in-fact to make important medical and financial decisions for the principal, only in the event that the principal becomes incapacitated. However, there are sometimes disagreements over whether or not a person is truly "incapacitated" to the point that the power of attorney has been triggered. This can lead to a court of law having to determine the issue.

Can a Wilmington, North Carolina Lawyer Help?

Setting up a power of attorney arrangement in Wilmington, North Carolina can be easy, but it can also be very confusing. It just varies on what you're trying to do. However, if you are at all unsure about how to proceed, it would probably be a good idea to have an attorney draft the agreement for you.

Talk to a Wills, Trusts and Estates Law Attorney now!

Life in Wilmington

Wilmington is in New Hanover County, North Carolina. It is the eighth most populated city in the state, with a population of 362,315 people. It was named after Spencer Compton, the Prime Minister under King George II. Also, in 2003 the city was recognized as "A Coast Guard City" by the United States Congress.

Some popular attractions are Airlie Gardens, Cape Fear Serpentarium, North Carolina Aquarium, Screen Gems Studios, USS North Carolina Battleship Museum, Thalian Hall Center for the Performing Arts, and Fourth Friday Gallery Nights.

Top employers of the city include Corning, Verizon Wireless, General Electric, and Pharmaceutical Product Development.

Wilmington is also home to many law firms and law offices that train excellent attorneys to handle any and every legal inquiry.

Famous residents include Sophia Bush, Chelsea Cooley, Alge Crumpler, Roman Gabriel, Joseph Gallison, Ed Hinton, Jana Kramer, James Lafferty, and Trot Nixon.

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