Power of Attorney in Tucson, Arizona

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In Tucson, Arizona, power of attorney is an arrangement in which one person (the principal) gives another (the attorney-in-fact) the capacity to act on the principal's behalf in certain situations, and under certain conditions. Power of attorney might be authorized for any number of reasons, but it is most often set up to allow the attorney-in-fact to make financial and medical decisions on the principal's behalf in the event that the principal becomes incapacitated.

The principal in a power-of-attorney arrangement is the one who decides the scope of the power that the attorney will be able to wield, and the circumstances under which they can wield it. Generally, you can grant the attorney-in-fact as much or as little decision-making power as you'd like. In every case, however, you should only enter a power-of-attorney arrangement with somebody you trust. The nature of the power you should grant depends heavily on the context, and what your wishes are.

If you have a strong preference with respect to end-of-life care, but worry that you might be unable to express your wishes when the time comes, you may want to give a family member the legal authority to make such decisions for you, if necessary. Of course, the power you grant them should be precisely limited to medical decisions, if that's all you want them to be able to decide. It should also clearly state that this power will not actually vest until and unless you actually become incapacitated. For reasons that should be obvious, you should only give this power to a person you trust.

In Tucson, Arizona, you can sometimes find pre-printed forms that let you easily draft a power-of-attorney agreement. However, if your situation is particularly complex, you should probably have a lawyer draft it for you, to ensure that the agreement is enforceable, or that there are no surprises.

Types of Power of Attorney Arrangements in Tucson, Arizona

Power of attorney in Tucson, Arizona takes 3 main forms. Which one is appropriate for you depends on your individual case. They are:

1. Limited power of attorney - this is the most limited form of power of attorney. It lets the attorney-in-fact exercise his or her power once, and in only one instance (laid out by the principal, of course). This is regularly used in business deals, if it is not convenient for the actual party to a deal to be physically present for the signing of some documents, it can be done through an attorney-in-fact. You simply need to give them the right to sign the paperwork on your behalf, and it will be just as binding as if you had signed the documents yourself.

2. Durable power of attorney - this gives the attorney-in-fact much more power than limited power of attorney. It can, in theory, give them unlimited power in a specific area of the principal's affairs. The document should lay out exactly what power the attorney-in-fact will wield. This agreement, when used carefully, can be very useful, allowing the attorney-in-fact to make important decisions for the principal as long as is necessary, because it does not automatically disappear after a single transaction. Also, the principal can revoke the power of attorney at any time.

3. Springing power of attorney - under this arrangement, the attorney-in-fact does not get power of attorney until the happening of some specified event. The specified event is usually the incapacity or disability of the principal, though it can be virtually any event you wish. You should be aware, however, that it is not always clear when the principal has become sufficiently "disabled" for the power of attorney to take effect. This question sometimes has to be decided by a court, which can be costly and time-consuming.

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Can a Tucson, Arizona Lawyer Help?

While setting up power of attorney in Tucson, Arizona can be simple, there are some situations in which it will inevitably be convoluted. In such cases, the process will be much easier if you have a reputable attorney to help you along the way.

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Life in Tucson

Tucson is a major city in Arizona and the county seat of Pima County.  With a population of about 548,000, it is the second largest city in Arizona after Phoenix.  Tucson is just over 100 miles from Phoenix and about an hour away from the U.S.-Mexico Border.

Often called "The Old Pueblo", Tucson is an attractive mix of traditional southwestern culture and modern innovations.  The downtown area of Tucson has retained much of its historic southwest feel.  Several downtown buildings such as the Hotel Congress and the Art Deco Fox Theater were constructed in the 1920's.  Midtown Tucson also draws many visitors to the city.  For example, the University of Arizona is located in midtown, which includes Arizona Stadium as well as the McKale Center. 

The tourism industry fuels much of Tucson's economy, with some 3.5 million visitors bringing in over $2 billion a year.  Tucson's warm climate attracts many "snowbirds", or winter visitors who often purchase a second home in the city.  Popular events for tourists include the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show and the Tucson Folk Festival.

Lawyers in Tucson, Arizona handle most of their cases at the Tucson City Court.  Tucson lawyers are available to help you understand the many laws that are unique to the state of Arizona. 

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