Cary Estate Planning

Find the right Wills & Trusts attorney in Cary, NC

"Estate planning" in Cary refers to the decisions a person makes regarding what is to be done with their assets after their death, and the process of implementing those wishes.

Estate planning normally requires professional legal and financial advice, because of the complexity and importance of the issues involved. A poorly-executed estate plan can commonly end with survivors suing each other, and prevent your intentions from being effectuated.

Estate planning can have several positive effects on the planner during life, as well. These benefits are normally somewhat intangible, revolving around the peace of mind that comes with knowing that, after your death, you family will be taken care of and that they'll know what your last wishes are. Nonetheless, most people find this very valuable. To that end, you should come up with a power-of-attorney agreement. When you grant someone power of attorney, you have given them the power to make particular decisions on your behalf. You can grant them as much or as little authority as you want. Most people, however, give family members or life partners power of attorney with respect to medical care, so if they become incapacitated, their wishes will still be carried out.

The last thing a person wants to think about is the possibility that, after their death, their survivors are fighting over some part of their estate plan that's ambiguous or otherwise contentious. If you want to prevent this, or at least make it far less likely, you should have the help of a Cary attorney every step of the way.

Common Features of Cary Estates

Will: A will is often the central component of an estate plan. It is a legal document which says what is to be done with a person's assets after they die. It normally involves giving money and property to the testator's close family members, friends, and sometimes charitable organizations.

Living Will: A living will contains instructions about your medical care, typically for the purpose of informing your family and doctors of your preferences if you suddenly become incapacitated. A living will is extremely crucial if you have any strong preferences in this area. It should be written with the advice of a doctor, so you know the specific medical consequences of your decisions, and a lawyer, so it is virtually guaranteed to be legally binding.

Power of Attorney: Power of attorney allows you to grant someone else (normally a trusted family member or friend) the power to make certain decisions in your place, with the same legal effect as if you had made them yourself, in the event that you become unable to do so (normally due to mental or physical incapacity). If you decide to give someone power of attorney, you should make your wishes known to them in advance, so they are more likely to make the same decisions that you would make, if you were able to. And, of course, you should only give this authority to someone with whom you would trust your life because that is, in some cases, just what you're doing.

Funeral Arrangements: You should make it very clear to the people handling your funeral what type of funeral you want, and what you want done with your body. You should not put these instructions in your will, because wills are commonly not read until days or weeks after the testator dies, by which point it may be too late to give their wishes on this subject effect.

Do I Need a Cary Estates Lawyer?

A brilliant lawyer in Cary can make the process of estate planning as simple as it possibly can be. He or she can help ensure that your wishes are given effect, and minimize the chances of disputes between your survivors.

Talk to a Wills, Trusts and Estates Law Attorney now!

Life in Cary

Cary, North Carolina, is situated in Wake County and Chatham County. The city is the second largest in Wake County with a population of 143,000 people. It is an important suburb of the city of Raleigh and belongs to the region known as "the Triangle" area. Cary is also less than 20 minutes from major universities like University of North Carolina and Duke. Over two-thirds of Cary adult residents have college degrees.

The city of Cary, North Carolina is known as the "Technology Town of North Carolina" due to its proximity to Research Triangle Park. The Research Triangle hosts research and development facilities for over 150 high-tech organizations, and is the worksite for over 39,000 employees. Also, Cary's government has made considerable efforts at increasing the quality and availability of technology in the city.

In addition, Cary's government maintains an aesthetically pleasing and artistic feel to the city. Popular destinations include William B. Umstead State Park, the Page-Walker Hotel, and the USA Baseball National Training Complex. Many events and festivals are held in Cary, North Carolina, such as the Spring Daze Arts Crafts Festival and the NC Eid Festival.

Lawyers in Cary, North Carolina practice law in many different fields and cover a variety of legal matters. Experienced attorneys in Cary are familiar with the unique laws of the city. They provide legal advice, guidance, and representation in situations where the presence of an attorney is needed.

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