Power of Attorney in Cary, North Carolina

Find the right Power of Attorney attorney in Cary, NC

In Cary, North Carolina, "power of attorney" refers to a variety of different legal arrangements. However, the various systems which fall under the umbrella of that term have one thing in common: if somebody grants power of attorney to somebody else, the person with power of attorney is authorized to make specific decisions on behalf of the person who granted it. There are many reasons why a person might want to grant this power to another, but it typically granted in contemplation of the possibility that the grantor might become unable to express his or her wishes due to some form of incapacity.

The principal is able to dictate the specific scope of the attorney-in-fact's authority. If you are giving someone power of attorney, you're probably planning on giving it to a close friend, family member, or life partner. The exact scope of the power is up to you, and will depend on what your goals are.

If you have a strong preference with respect to end-of-life care, but worry that you might be unable to express your wishes when the time comes, you may want to give a family member the legal authority to make such choices for you, if necessary. Of course, the power you grant them should be clearly limited to medical decisions, if that's all you want them to be able to decide. It should further clearly state that this power will not really vest until and unless you actually become incapacitated. For reasons that should be obvious, you should only give this power to a person you trust.

In Cary, North Carolina, you can sometimes find pre-printed forms that let you easily draft a power-of-attorney agreement. However, if your situation is particularly complex, you should probably have a lawyer draft it for you, to ensure that the agreement is enforceable, or that there are no surprises.

Types of Power of Attorney Arrangements in Cary, North Carolina

There are 3 power-of-attorney plans that can be set up in Cary, North Carolina. Which one is best for you will largely depend on your goals, and your individual situation. They are:

1. Limited power of attorney - this is the most limited form of power of attorney. It lets the attorney-in-fact exercise his or her power once, and in only one instance (laid out by the principal, of course). This is typically used in business deals, if it is not convenient for the actual party to a deal to be physically present for the signing of some documents, it can be done through an attorney-in-fact. You simply need to give them the power to sign the paperwork on your behalf, and it will be just as binding as if you had signed the documents yourself.

2. Durable power of attorney - unlike limited power of attorney, this does not automatically expire, and can last as long as the principal wishes. It can also be revoked by the principal. For example, if you want someone to handle your financial affairs for a time, you can give them the relevant authority in your power of attorney agreement, and it will last as long as you want it to. Of course, you should only give such power to someone you trust.

3. Springing power of attorney - under this arrangement, the attorney-in-fact does not get power of attorney until the happening of some mentioned event. The specified event is normally the incapacity or disability of the principal, though it can be virtually any event you wish. You should be aware, however, that it is not always clear when the principal has become sufficiently "disabled" for the power of attorney to take effect. This question sometimes has to be determined by a court, which can be costly and time-consuming.

Can a Cary, North Carolina Lawyer Help?

Because setting up a power of attorney agreement is not always simple in Cary, North Carolina, it's never imprudent to at least talk with a lawyer beforehand. As with any legal agreement, there are things that can go wrong, which laypersons may not foresee.

Talk to a Wills, Trusts and Estates Law Attorney now!

Life in Cary

Cary, North Carolina, is situated in Wake County and Chatham County. The city is the second largest in Wake County with a population of 143,000 people. It is an important suburb of the city of Raleigh and belongs to the region known as "the Triangle" area. Cary is also less than 20 minutes from major universities like University of North Carolina and Duke. Over two-thirds of Cary adult residents have college degrees.

The city of Cary, North Carolina is known as the "Technology Town of North Carolina" due to its proximity to Research Triangle Park. The Research Triangle hosts research and development facilities for over 150 high-tech organizations, and is the worksite for over 39,000 employees. Also, Cary's government has made considerable efforts at increasing the quality and availability of technology in the city.

In addition, Cary's government maintains an aesthetically pleasing and artistic feel to the city. Popular destinations include William B. Umstead State Park, the Page-Walker Hotel, and the USA Baseball National Training Complex. Many events and festivals are held in Cary, North Carolina, such as the Spring Daze Arts Crafts Festival and the NC Eid Festival.

Lawyers in Cary, North Carolina practice law in many different fields and cover a variety of legal matters. Experienced attorneys in Cary are familiar with the unique laws of the city. They provide legal advice, guidance, and representation in situations where the presence of an attorney is needed.

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